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According to Florida law, a business and/or property owner can be held liable for not taking additional precautions for your safety when a danger is such that the owner should reasonably anticipate that it creates an unreasonable risk of harm despite a warning or your knowledge of the danger:

An owner is subject to liability for not taking additional precautions for the safety of the invitee when the danger is such that the owner should reasonably anticipate that it creates an unreasonable risk of harm to an invitee notwithstanding a warning or the invitee’s knowledge of the danger. Stewart v. Boho, Inc., 493 So.2d at 96. The defendant must be chargeable with actual or constructive knowledge of a danger. Pittman v. Volusia County, 380 So.2d at 1195. A landowner is not required to take measures to avoid a danger which circumstances as known to him to not suggest as likely to happen. Cassel v. Price. Whether a condition on the premises is likely to present a danger to an invitee will be largely dependent on the nature of the operations or activities of the invitee when he encounters it. If the owner has no reason to know of the activities of the invitee which expose the invitee to the danger, he cannot reasonably anticipate the danger, and therefore cannot take the steps necessary to protect the invitee.

See: Miller v. Wallace, 591 So. 2d 971

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